.wunderkammer.

. wunderkammer .
small and slightly curious items,
is an artist in residence, here?

glass housed and labelled

ten years ago.

this house is closed, yet

will open at 10 am.

possibly. it varies
different days,
according to the programme.

google calendar.

sbm.

16122843_676635309162840_824963763298893824_n
*notes
Cabinets of curiosities (also known as Kunstkabinett, Kunstkammer, Wunderkammer, Cabinets of Wonder, and wonder-rooms) were encyclopedic collections of objects whose categorical boundaries were, in Renaissance Europe, yet to be defined. Modern terminology would categorize the objects included as belonging to natural history (sometimes faked), geology, ethnography, archaeology, religious or historical relics, works of art (including cabinet paintings), and antiquities. “The Kunstkammer was regarded as a microcosm or theater of the world, and a memory theater. The Kunstkammer conveyed symbolically the patron’s control of the world through its indoor, microscopic reproduction.”[1] Of Charles I of England‘s collection, Peter Thomas states succinctly, “The Kunstkabinett itself was a form of propaganda”[2] Besides the most famous, best documented cabinets of rulers and aristocrats, members of the merchant class and early practitioners of science in Europe formed collections that were precursors to museums.